Rights of shareholders

 

AS THE COMPANY IS INCORPORATED IN BANGLADESH (NOT IN UK), IT IS HEREBY STATED THAT THE RIGHTS OF SHAREHOLDERS OF THE COMPANY MAY BE DIFFERENT FROM THE RIGHTS OF SHAREHOLDERS IN A UK INCORPORATED COMPANY

The following sets out a brief summary of the salient provisions of Bangladeshi company law and regulation relating to rights of shareholders of the Company. It is not, and is not intended to be, an exhaustive or definitive lists of such rights but is intended merely to provide brief details and information relating to such rights.

General
The rights of the shareholders (including the holders of AIM Securities) of the Company are included in the Bangladesh Companies Act 1994, the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Ordinance 1969 (together with the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Commission Act 1993 and the rules made thereunder) and the rules of the Dhaka Stock Exchange (DSE) and the Chittagong Stock Exchange (CSE); and the Company's Articles of Association.

Shareholders' Meetings
Resolutions to be proposed at shareholders' meetings are classed as either ordinary (requiring a bare majority in number of shares held by persons who attend and vote at the meeting), or special or extraordinary (both requiring a 75 per cent. majority in number of shares held by persons who attend and vote at the meeting).

Bangladesh Companies Act, 1994 requires at least 14 days' notice to be given to shareholders to call an Annual (or Ordinary) General Meeting (or 21 days if special or extraordinary resolutions are to be proposed at such meeting) and 21 days' notice for an Extraordinary General Meeting.

An Annual General Meeting of the company must be held once per calendar year and no more than fifteen months after the previous Annual General Meeting. Shareholders should be sent the audited accounts of the company together with directors' and auditors' reports thereon, proposed to be laid before such Annual General Meeting together with the notice convening such meeting. Further, the Annual General Meeting of a listed company for a year is required to be held within six months of the company's year end.

As in the UK, the holders of not less than one tenth of the issued share capital of a company have the ability to requisition an extraordinary general meeting.

A shareholder has the right to receive notice of a shareholders' meeting; attend such a meeting; and raise an issue related to the businesses conducted at any such meeting.

At any general meeting:

  1. on a show of hands, every member who is present in person shall have one vote; and
  2. on a poll, every member who is present in person or by proxy has one vote for every share of which he is the holder.


The quorum for a Shareholders' meeting is five persons entitled to vote and present in person. A proxy representing a Shareholder which is a company may not vote unless his appointment as proxy has been approved by a resolution of the directors of the appointing company, which resolution remains in full force and effect at the time of the meeting.

Financial Disclosures
Under the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Rules, 1987, Bangladeshi listed companies are obliged to prepare annual audited accounts, audited by a chartered accountant, and to send such accounts to the Bangladesh SEC, the relevant stock exchanges and all shareholders of such company at least fourteen days prior to holding of its AGM.

These financial statements, in addition to the requirements of the Securities and Exchange Rules, 1987 and the Bangladesh Companies Act 1994, are required to comply with the International Accounting Standards as adopted by the Institute of the Chartered Accountants of Bangladesh. In auditing these financial statements, the auditors are also required to conduct their audit in conformity with the International Standards of Auditing as adopted by the Institute of the Chartered Accountants of Bangladesh.

Further, the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Rules, 1987 require Bangladeshi listed companies to prepare half-yearly accounts, which do not have to be audited, but do have to be sent to the Bangladesh SEC, the relevant stock exchanges and all shareholders of such company. The half-yearly accounts must contain a balance sheet, profit and loss account and cash-flow statements prepared in the same way as the annual audited accounts are prepared, and must be sent within one month of the half-year end.

Also, a listed company is subject to continuing disclosure requirements pursuant to the Listing Regulations of the DSE and the CSE. Accordingly, a listed company is required to inform the Bangladesh SEC, the DSE and the CSE immediately of any ''price sensitive information'' (as defined above).

In addition, a listed company must notify the Bangladesh SEC, the DSE and the CSE of the following:

any change in its board of directors; and any change in the holding of each director, officer and/or other shareholder of the company who is or has been the legal owner of ten per cent. or above of any class of the company's listed securities at any point of time within seven days of such change; and
Every transfer of share by the company's sponsors (including every director, promoter and officer) within seven days of such transfer.
Protection of Minority Interests
Minority shareholders who feel that the Company's affairs are being conducted in a manner prejudicial to their interests may apply to court for relief in a procedure analogous to that contained in the UK Companies Act 1985.

Enquiries into the Company's Affairs
The holders of not less than 5 per cent. of the issued share capital of a Bangladeshi listed company can petition to the Bangladesh SEC to make enquirers into the affairs of the company in which they hold shares, or its business and transactions, under the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Ordinance 1969. If the Bangladesh SEC decides to investigate, it has the power to require the production of information from the company and its directors, officers and employees.

Dividends
Under the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Ordinance,1969 and the rules of the DSE and the CSE, when a final or interim dividend is approved by the directors of a Bangladeshi listed company, the DSE, the CSE and the Bangladesh SEC require that decision to be notified to them within 30 (thirty) minutes. The decision (as notified) will be subject to shareholders' approval in the Annual General Meeting if the dividend is a final dividend. The dividends must be disbursed to the shareholders with 60 days of such declaration.

Issue of Shares
The Bangladesh Companies Act, 1994 also gives shareholders pre-emption rights, which may be disapplied by a resolution of the Directors. However, the Articles of Association of the Company provide that, subject to a Shareholders' resolution to the contrary, any new shares to be issued must first be issued to the existing Shareholders pro rata to their holdings.

Issue of Redeemable Shares
A Bangladeshi company may issue and redeem redeemable shares with shareholders' approval in a meeting.

Reduction of Share Capital
A Bangladeshi company may by special resolution reduce its share capital in any manner subject to Court confirmation in a procedure analogous to that contained in the UK Companies Act, 1985.

Share Buy Back
A Bangladeshi company may buy back its own shares only by way of a court-approved reduction of capital.

Financial Assistance to Shareholders for Acquisition of Shares
Subject to certain very limited exceptions, the Company, being a public company, must not give financial assistance to any person for the purposes of the acquisition of any shares in the Company.

Determination Shareholders' Interests in Shares
As in the UK, the register of members is definitive for determining the members of the Company.

Removal of Directors
The shareholders of a company may, by extraordinary resolution in a general meeting, remove any director and appoint a director to fill that vacancy.

Loans to Directors
The Company is not permitted to make any loans to directors or any person connected with a director, unless the loan is for less than 50 per cent. of the value of the shares in the Company held by the director; is approved by the Company in a general meeting; is approved by the directors; and is specifically referred to in the annual report and accounts of the Company.

Sale of Undertaking or Assets
There is no equivalent to the UK Companies Act 1985 provisions requiring the shareholders to sanction the acquisition or sale of a non-cash asset between a director and the Company.

Under the Bangladesh Companies Act 1994, the directors may not sell the undertaking of the Company without the consent of the shareholders in a general meeting.

Takeovers and Substantial Acquisitions
The Company is not subject to the City Code on Takeovers and Mergers as, being incorporated in Bangladesh, the Panel on Takeovers and Mergers does not regard the Company as being resident in the UK, the Channel Islands or the Isle of Man. As a result, a takeover of the Company would not be regulated by the UK Panel on Takeovers and Mergers. Under the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Ordinance, 1969, companies listed on a Bangladeshi stock exchange are obliged to disclose to the Bangladesh SEC names and number of all holdings, amongst others, by any other person or entity of shares representing 10 per cent. or more of the issued share capital of the company. The Company will be obliged to make such a disclosure in relation to the Depositary upon Admission but the Company will not be obliged to disclose details of the holders of GDRs (being the beneficial holders of the New Ordinary Shares) even if any such GDR holder holds GDRs representing more than 10 per cent of the Ordinary Shares therein issue. The Depositary and the holders of GDRs will not be subject to any disclosure requirements in Bangladesh.

In addition, the rules of the DSE and CSE require changes in ''substantial shareholdings'' to be disclosed to the DSE and/or the CSE, as applicable, by the Company. Whilst ''substantial shareholding'' is not defined and there is no case law on the point, local market practice would suggest that shareholdings of 10 per cent. and above, and changes to such shareholdings, also need to be disclosed to the DSE and/or the CSE, by the Company.

Where a shareholder enters into a contract or a memorandum of understanding to acquire 10 per cent or more of the issued share capital of a Bangladeshi listed company from another Shareholder, he is obliged, under the Bangladesh Securities and Exchange Commission (Substantial Acquisition of Shares and Takeovers) Regulations, 2002, to make a public announcement, through a merchant banker, within three days of such contract or memorandum of understanding, specifying details of the acquiror including his percentage shareholding in the relevant company, the salient features of the contract or memorandum of understanding, and, if the acquiror wishes to make a wider offer to acquire shares, the number of shares that the acquiror would be prepared to buy from the public together with the terms of such proposed acquisition. The purchase price of such offer must be the higher of the price agreed under the contract or memorandum of understanding and the average trading price of the company's shares during the previous 6 months. A shareholder is not obliged to make an offer to the public in the public announcement, but is obliged to make a public announcement (including a statement that he does not intend to make a public offer) upon each acquisition when such shareholder holds in excess of 10 per cent of the issued share capital of a Bangladeshi listed company. These regulations will not apply to the Depositary on the issue of the New Ordinary Shares.

If a shareholder does acquire over 90 per cent of the issued share capital of a Bangladeshi listed company, the shareholder shall make an offer for the shares remaining in public hands.

Bangladeshi law does not have an equivalent provision to the mandatory transfer provisions contained in section 429 of the UK Companies Act, 1985 which enable an offeror who has acquired 90 per cent. of the shares in a company to compulsorily acquire the outstanding minority. However, the Bangladesh Companies Act, 1994 does contain provisions for a court to sanction a scheme of arrangement (similar to the provisions in section 425 of the UK Companies Act 1985) and, subject to such court approval, for the mandatory transfer of shares pursuant to a scheme if the scheme is approved by not less than three quarters of the shareholders, within 120 days of the offer to acquire the entire issued share capital of a company.

Shareholders holding over 10 per cent. of the issued share capital of Bangladeshi listed companies are not permitted to enter into derivatives contracts referenced to their shares under which they short sell such shares.

Constitution
The memorandum and articles of association are the constitutional documents of a Bangladeshi company. A company's memorandum and articles of association (other than the objects clause) may be altered by a special resolution of the shareholders in general meeting. The objects clause can only be altered subject to confirmation from the Court.